My best photographs come by chance, not design.

With the advent of the digital camera, producing images has become faster, cheaper, and easier. Still, all that really means is that I produce more images, not that the images I produce are going to be any better, anything near becoming a “classic.” I currently have almost 180gbs of RAW images (well over 32,000 individual photos). I have several thousand film negatives stored away. Almost all of which are mediocre, rising nowhere near a piece of art. If I am honest with myself, I must admit that my best photographs come by chance, not design.

I love to wander taking photos. In late June and the first part of July I traveled some 3,500 miles by car twice. The road trip resulted in nearly 3000 images. Only two or three are truly artistic. I know that I can’t arbitrarily create a stunning photo. When it happens, it just happens.

There is undoubtedly a symbiotic relationship between the camera’s mechanisms and the photographer, and knowledge of the camera certainly helps. But a mechanism cannot create an emotional tug. Even if I feel the tug, the unerring eye of the camera is just as likely to capture something unpleasing and un-artistic. Let’s face it, capturing an artistic image that pulls at one’s emotions is just plain blind luck. And by the way, there is a difference between “pleasing images” (which is what most of mine are) and images that are truly art, that truly speak in some way to the viewer.

When I find that special image, Wow! “Wow’s” come few and far between. Meanwhile, I just keep prodding along taking photos and hoping that somewhere in the bunch will be that shot that captures the imagination. Please let me add one last thought, I am still trying to figure out what a “good” photograph is, what makes a photo “art.”

Frank
Round Rock, Texas
August 2, 2015